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Schedule

  • Friday, March 15, 2019
    07:00 Registration & Light Breakfast
    North Lobby/Exhibit Hall
    07:50 Welcome & Review Schedule for Day
    Exhibit Hall
    08:00 General Session
    BJ Jungmann, Masters Public Administration, CFO, Paramedic and Brian Carlson, Bachelors in Public Administration, EFO, Paramedic "Provider Mental Health: It Starts With Culture"
    Mental health is a contemporary topic in public safety. Many people and organizations are trying to understand and fix the mental health system for not only for the public but our own personnel. Burnsville Fire Department has been on a journey in recent years addressing the mental health of its staff. Their journey includes leaders getting mental health treatment and working to change the culture of the organization to make it ok to seek treatment. We will bring you along on our journey of changing the culture of our organization.
    Exhibit Hall
    8:15-11:30 Adult Airway Skills Lab (20 students)
    Jeff Schultz, B.S., NRP, CCEMTP
    Stabile Building, bussed from North Lobby Doors
    09:00 Breakout Sessions
    "EMS Review: Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma" JD Rutledge
    The presenter will review differences in treating children vs adults with orthopedic injuries including growth plate injuries. Various pediatric orthopedic trauma cases will be shown and how these were ultimately treated with both surgical and non-surgical care.
    Suite 102
    "Situational Awareness: Not The Everyday Scene Safety" James Graham, Chief Investigator
    In this day and age EMS providers are becoming targets of those looking for narcotics, money, or just someone to victimize. Several areas of the country do not send law enforcement on EMS calls unless something specific requires that they respond. This lecture will discuss realistic pre-dispatch planning, signs of impending assault, in call tips to avoid confrontation, and the liabilities involved with protecting oneself from harm.
    Suite 103
    "Accidental Hypothermia: A Death and Life Situation" Brian Murley, Certified Flight Nurse
    Through a pediatric case study, the concepts of accidental hypothermia will be reviewed. Pathophysiology, assessment, treatments and transport considerations will all be discussed for each temperature zone of hypothermia.
    Suite 104
    10:00 Refreshment Break & Exhibit Area Open
    Exhibit Hall
    10:30 Breakout Sessions (Repeat of 9am Sessions)
    "EMS Review: Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma" JD Rutledge, PA
    The presenter will review differences in treating children vs adults with orthopedic injuries including growth plate injuries. Various pediatric orthopedic trauma cases will be shown and how these were ultimately treated with both surgical and non-surgical care.
    Suite 102
    "Situational Awareness: Not The Everyday Scene Safety" James Graham, Chief Investigator
    In this day and age EMS providers are becoming targets of those looking for narcotics, money, or just someone to victimize. Several areas of the country do not send law enforcement on EMS calls unless something specific requires that they respond. This lecture will discuss realistic pre-dispatch planning, signs of impending assault, in call tips to avoid confrontation, and the liabilities involved with protecting oneself from harm.
    Suite 103
    "Accidental Hypothermia: A Death and Life Situation" Brian Murley, Certified Flight Nurse
    Through a pediatric case study, the concepts of accidental hypothermia will be reviewed. Pathophysiology, assessment, treatments and transport considerations will all be discussed for each temperature zone of hypothermia.
    Suite 104
    11:30 Lunch and Exhibit Area Open
    Exhibit Hall
    12:30 General Session
    James Graham, Chief Investigator "Swimming With Sharks: Dirty Trial Tricks and Tactics"
    In this sue happy society governmental agencies with deep pockets are the perfect target. The fact is a service or provider can do everything right and still be successfully sued. Insurance companies, weighing risk and benefit, will most generally settle rather than take the chance of going to trial. This has two distinct downfalls for agencies in that it appears they were in error and it makes them a bigger target once word gets out. This lecture is unique in that it was developed with the assistance of several top criminal and civil attorneys who were willing to discuss their tricks of the trade to sway testimony and word play on defendants to direct them into saying exactly what they want them to say.
    Exhibit Hall
    1:30 Breakout Sessions - NEW sessions
    Todd Emanuel, RN and Terri Elsbernd, MS, RN "Bleeding Control Train the Trainer Course (B-CON)"

    The B-Con Train-the-Trainer course will enable individuals to be certified to instruct this course in their communities. Targeted groups may include school districts, manufacturing facilities, leaders of school aged groups (Cub Scouts/Girl Scouts/4H), and Sportsmen's clubs.

    B-Con teaches participants the basic life-saving medical interventions, including bleeding control with a tourniquet, bleeding control with gauze packs or topical hemostatic agents, and opening an airway to allow a casualty to breathe. The course is designed for NON tactical law enforcement officers, firefighters, security personnel, teachers and other civilians requiring this basic training. The B-Con course is designed for those who have little or no medical training but may be called upon to respond to and deliver trauma care and bleeding control prior to emergency medical services (EMS) arrival or in an austere environment

    Suite 102
    James Graham, Chief Investigator "Isn't There Someone Who Does That For Us?: Success in Field Training and Burnout"
    Being a Field Training Officer (FTO) is one of the most important assignments for which an experienced provider can volunteer. Unfortunately, some providers also “get volunteered,” which is not the best way to select FTOs. Field training officers have the single most important impact on how an agency will be received by the community they serve. They are responsible for shaping the character of new officers who will be working for an agency for the next 20 to 30 years. Unfortunately many departments have allowed their training programs to become antiquated, stiff, rigid, and black and white. Recent studies on precepting have indicated that new ways of training our employees may have better successes and make for longer happier careers. This lecture takes a humorous look at the FTO process and how agencies can better train new employees.
    Suite 103
    Lisa A. Beck, MS, APRN, CNS, CRRN and Mary Claypool, PT, DScPT, NCS "Stayin' Alive – The Next Steps For Those With Chronic Disability"
    Patients with neurological impairments, including those with previous stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury have unique needs that may affect their care. Emergency providers will encounter those in these populations. This presentation will help prepare these providers to be aware of common conditions and methods to best service this population in an emergency scenario.
    Suite 104
    Meghan Kraut, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department "Active Shooter & Reporting Suspicious Activity"
    This Active Shooter & Reporting Suspicious Activity is the presentation given by LVMPD officers around Southern Nevada to various groups such as Law Enforcement academies, private business, casinos, religious establishments and schools. This teaches individuals what to look for with suspicious behavior around there own facilities and how to prepare for a potential threat, whether work place violence or a school shooter. Individuals learn firsthand knowledge of what to expect when first responders arrive, along with the do's and don'ts during an actual event.
    Suite 105
    2:30 Refreshment Break & Exhibit Area Open
    Exhibit Hall
    3:00 Breakout Sessions - Repeat 1:30 sessions
    Todd Emanuel, RN and Terri Elsbernd, MS, RN "Bleeding Control Train the Trainer Course (B-CON)"

    The B-Con Train-the-Trainer course will enable individuals to be certified to instruct this course in their communities. Targeted groups may include school districts, manufacturing facilities, leaders of school aged groups (Cub Scouts/Girl Scouts/4H), and Sportsmen's clubs.

    B-Con teaches participants the basic life-saving medical interventions, including bleeding control with a tourniquet, bleeding control with gauze packs or topical hemostatic agents, and opening an airway to allow a casualty to breathe. The course is designed for NON tactical law enforcement officers, firefighters, security personnel, teachers and other civilians requiring this basic training. The B-Con course is designed for those who have little or no medical training but may be called upon to respond to and deliver trauma care and bleeding control prior to emergency medical services (EMS) arrival or in an austere environment

    Suite 102
    James Graham, Chief Investigator "Isn't There Someone Who Does That For Us?: Success in Field Training and Burnout"
    Being a Field Training Officer (FTO) is one of the most important assignments for which an experienced provider can volunteer. Unfortunately, some providers also “get volunteered,” which is not the best way to select FTOs. Field training officers have the single most important impact on how an agency will be received by the community they serve. They are responsible for shaping the character of new officers who will be working for an agency for the next 20 to 30 years. Unfortunately many departments have allowed their training programs to become antiquated, stiff, rigid, and black and white. Recent studies on precepting have indicated that new ways of training our employees may have better successes and make for longer happier careers. This lecture takes a humorous look at the FTO process and how agencies can better train new employees.
    Suite 103
    Lisa A. Beck, MS, APRN, CNS, CRRN and Mary Claypool, PT, DScPT, NCS "Stayin' Alive – The Next Steps For Those With Chronic Disability"
    Patients with neurological impairments, including those with previous stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury have unique needs that may affect their care. Emergency providers will encounter those in these populations. This presentation will help prepare these providers to be aware of common conditions and methods to best service this population in an emergency scenario.
    Suite 104
    Meghan Kraut, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department "Active Shooter & Reporting Suspicious Activity"
    This Active Shooter & Reporting Suspicious Activity is the presentation given by LVMPD officers around Southern Nevada to various groups such as Law Enforcement academies, private business, casinos, religious establishments and schools. This teaches individuals what to look for with suspicious behavior around there own facilities and how to prepare for a potential threat, whether work place violence or a school shooter. Individuals learn firsthand knowledge of what to expect when first responders arrive, along with the do's and don'ts during an actual event.
    Suite 105
    04:00 General Session
    Katie Hershberger, CCRN, BSN "Modern Medicine In A Conservative Community"
    Practicing modern medicine in a conservative community can have its challenges. Understanding the limited knowledge of the Amish community can help the medical team overcome challenges they may be faced with. There may be a communication barrier while trying to provide care to this conservative community. Patients from this community will utilize modern medicine as a last resort, after alternative measures have failed. Depending on the severity of the situation there may be a community decision on the care accepted for these patients. During this presentation I will discuss the most common alternative medicine utilized by the Amish community.
    Exhibit Hall
    5:00 Closing Remarks. Evalutations and Adjournment
  • Saturday, March 16, 2019
    07:00 Registration & Light Breakfast
    North Lobby/Exhibit Hall
    07:50 Welcome & Review Schedule for Day
    Exhibit Hall
    08:00 General Session
    James Graham, Chief Investigator "Drug Recognition-Cop Stuff For EMS Providers"
    The DRE system breaks all drugs down into 7 categories each with clinical indicators of use. This program shows the provider how to identify the signs and symptoms of drug use through the DRE matrix prior to lab confirmation. Although the DRE program was developed for police officers this class will show how it can be adapted for use by medical professionals to systematically identify or rule out drug use which can then assist in directing a course of treatment. The DRE program is a nationally recognized program for identifying drug impairment in the impaired driver.
    Exhibit Hall
    8:15-11:30 Adult Airway Skills Lab (20 students)
    Jeff Schultz, B.S., NRP, CCEMTP
    Stabile Building, bussed from North Lobby Doors
    09:00 Breakout Sessions
    "Transgender Patients in the Emergency Room: A Cultural Sensitive Perspective" Lynne Wiegand, BSN, MSN
    In the United States, one cannot help but notice the increase media coverage of the transgender population. Lately, the emergency staff has encountered a rise in treating transgender patients. Appropriate and yet sensitive questions have been raised by staff in the emergency room. What is cisgender? Why do some transgender patients desire to be referenced as “they”? Is there more information on the transgender patient we don’t know but should? Indeed with the opening of new Transgender Clinics, information about this unique population is surfacing. This presentation will focus on new terminology used by transgender patients and Transgender & Intersex Clinics identify challenges and implement strategies to be successful in communicating with transgender patients.
    Suite 102
    "The Ethical Dilemma: Ethics Outside The Box" James Graham, Chief Investigator
    Often times, because of the characteristics of our jobs, public service employees find themselves under scrutiny for decisions that are made in one second increments without the ability of forethought. In other cases we find ourselves in trouble for blatant policy breeches outside patient care for the same reason. This is not the typical medical ethics lecture but an in-depth look at how policy and reality collide through the use of case study, academic study, and stranger than life scenarios, so we may learn from the mistakes of others.
    Suite 103
    "Trauma…With A Twist OR How Not To Make Things Worse" Mark Ross, PA-C, NRP
    Pre-hospital and post ambulance providers train and practice for trauma on a frequent basis. Over the years we have focused on rapid exams, treatment, transport then off to surgical services. One aspect that is very seldom considered is viewing patients exposed to CBRNE events as a “trauma patient” who requires a completely different approach. This includes the steps of 1. Awareness 2. Stopping the typical “rush to ED” approach 3. Decon practices 4. What happens to an ED if they get contaminated and 5. What to expect if the proper steps are NOT followed.
    Suite 104
    10:00 Refreshment Break & Exhibit Area Open
    Exhibit Hall
    10:30 Breakout Sessions (Repeat of 9am Sessions)
    "Transgender Patients in the Emergency Room: A Cultural Sensitive Perspective" Lynne Wiegand, BSN, MSN
    In the United States, one cannot help but notice the increase media coverage of the transgender population. Lately, the emergency staff has encountered a rise in treating transgender patients. Appropriate and yet sensitive questions have been raised by staff in the emergency room. What is cisgender? Why do some transgender patients desire to be referenced as “they”? Is there more information on the transgender patient we don’t know but should? Indeed with the opening of new Transgender Clinics, information about this unique population is surfacing. This presentation will focus on new terminology used by transgender patients and Transgender & Intersex Clinics identify challenges and implement strategies to be successful in communicating with transgender patients.
    Suite 102
    "The Ethical Dilemma: Ethics Outside The Box" James Graham, Chief Investigator
    Often times, because of the characteristics of our jobs, public service employees find themselves under scrutiny for decisions that are made in one second increments without the ability of forethought. In other cases we find ourselves in trouble for blatant policy breeches outside patient care for the same reason. This is not the typical medical ethics lecture but an in-depth look at how policy and reality collide through the use of case study, academic study, and stranger than life scenarios, so we may learn from the mistakes of others.
    Suite 103
    "Trauma…With A Twist OR How Not To Make Things Worse" Mark Ross, PA-C, NRP
    Pre-hospital and post ambulance providers train and practice for trauma on a frequent basis. Over the years we have focused on rapid exams, treatment, transport then off to surgical services. One aspect that is very seldom considered is viewing patients exposed to CBRNE events as a “trauma patient” who requires a completely different approach. This includes the steps of 1. Awareness 2. Stopping the typical “rush to ED” approach 3. Decon practices 4. What happens to an ED if they get contaminated and 5. What to expect if the proper steps are NOT followed.
    Suite 104
    11:30 Lunch and Exhibit Area Open
    Last time with vendors and Door Prize Drawing
    Exhibit Hall
    12:30 General Session
    Meghan Kraut, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, "Route 91-Las Vegas Shooting"
    A lone gunman opened fire on a crowd of concertgoers attending the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival on the Las Vegas Strip, leaving 58 dead and over 900 injured. This presentation will explain the response by Police, Fire & Medical, Distraction Calls, Crime Scenes, Investigative Findings, Employee Wellness and Take Aways.
    Exhibit Hall
    2:00 Breakout Sessions NEW Sessions
    John R. Fox, NRP "That's Not My Job…Or How To Hurt Someone Without Even Trying"
    The public counts on us to provide effective, safe, and prompt service no matter the time, conditions, or location. Often our responses involve many people across many disciplines and organizations. This course will question if we are using team work or are we just a bunch of people doing a job at the same time. Using Crew Resource Management (CRM) concepts, participants will have a greater understanding of team dynamics CRM techniques and tools have been adopted from high risk professions including aviation, haz-mat transportation, and nuclear power generation. Students will review tools to improve team communication, improve decision making, and reduce risk for both patients, providers, and organizations.
    This session is appropriate for EMR, EMT, AEMT, Paramedic, Supervisor/Manager, and in-hospital providers
    Suite 102
    James Graham, Chief Investigator "Into the Tunnel-Tunnel Vision Stress Response"
    Almost everyone at one time or another has experienced the phenomenon of tunnel vision. This extreme stress response not only limits our ability to complete our job properly during a traumatic event but can actually endanger our lives. Participants in this lecture will come to understand the pathophysiology of extreme stress response as well as explore ways of combating it.
    Suite 103
    Helen Bagshaw, CCRN, RN "Hidden In Plain Sight"
    The Winona County Alliance for Substance Abuse Prevention (ASAP) has hosted 12 free "Hidden in Plain Sight" exhibits in less than two years. This experience guides parents, guardians and community members through a mock teen bedroom to raise awareness about potentially over-looked household items that may be indicators of experimental or regular substance use. The exhibit started in response to demand from local parents. Parents wish they had more information about identifying substance use and what to do if their kid is using drugs, alcohol and marijuana. ASAP volunteers wanted to do something about it and are excited to host this free traveling exhibit in the community and provide other resources for families and community members on teen substance abuse. ASAP is a coalition of community members devoted to cultivating a drug-free culture for youth in the Winona area.
    Suite 104
    Dr. Daniel Keyler, Adjunct Professor "When A Venomous Snake Bites: Consequences And What To Do (Or Not Do)"
    Venomous snakebite should be considered a true medical emergency, and seeking medical care following a bite should be of the highest priority. The risk of sustaining a venomous snakebite is greatest among those who work with, or collect and maintain, venomous snakes such as professional zoo staff and amateur herpetologists, respectively. Other more natural risks stem from the geographic locality in which one lives, and the species of snakes present, and their density in those localities where humans live. Outside of natural circumstances and encounters venomous snakebites typically result due to poor judgment, carelessness, fatigue, cavalier attitude, working with venomous snakes alone and without proper equipment, and lack of common sense. These factors hold true whether in the amateur home collection, or academic and professional settings. The possibility of death following a venomous snakebite is an ever-present concern in developing tropical countries, but is extremely rare in the United States. However, there are other more common consequences of venomous snakebite that must be considered and are often overlooked, such as the loss of a finger, loss of limb motion and function, and other long-term neurological disabilities. Taking appropriate actions in a timely manner in emergent situations are of significant importance to achieve a favorable medical outcome. Just, what will you do, and what will happen, if a venomous bite has occurred? These are basic, but essential, considerations. Many complexities can arise during the transport of an envenomed patient, and when the snakebite victim arrives at a medical facility. Given the unusualness of a venomous snakebite patient, and the possibility that a non-native species may be involved, medical personnel are frequently uncertain and unfamiliar with the most appropriate course of action to take. Will anti-venom be needed, and if so what type of anti-venom will be needed, where will the anti-venom come from, and is a clinical toxicologist knowledgeable in the treatment of venomous snakebite available for consultation if needed? Collectively, all these components need to be taken into account when a venomous snake has bitten a human being.
    Suite 105
    3:00 Refreshment Break
    Exhibit Hall
    3:15 Breakout Sessions (Repeat of 2:00 Sessions)
    John R. Fox, NRP "That's Not My Job…Or How To Hurt Someone Without Even Trying"
    The public counts on us to provide effective, safe, and prompt service no matter the time, conditions, or location. Often our responses involve many people across many disciplines and organizations. This course will question if we are using team work or are we just a bunch of people doing a job at the same time. Using Crew Resource Management (CRM) concepts, participants will have a greater understanding of team dynamics CRM techniques and tools have been adopted from high risk professions including aviation, haz-mat transportation, and nuclear power generation. Students will review tools to improve team communication, improve decision making, and reduce risk for both patients, providers, and organizations.
    This session is appropriate for EMR, EMT, AEMT, Paramedic, Supervisor/Manager, and in-hospital providers
    Suite 102
    James Graham, Chief Investigator "Into the Tunnel-Tunnel Vision Stress Response"
    Almost everyone at one time or another has experienced the phenomenon of tunnel vision. This extreme stress response not only limits our ability to complete our job properly during a traumatic event but can actually endanger our lives. Participants in this lecture will come to understand the pathophysiology of extreme stress response as well as explore ways of combating it.
    Suite 103
    Helen Bagshaw, CCRN, RN "Hidden In Plain Sight"
    The Winona County Alliance for Substance Abuse Prevention (ASAP) has hosted 12 free "Hidden in Plain Sight" exhibits in less than two years. This experience guides parents, guardians and community members through a mock teen bedroom to raise awareness about potentially over-looked household items that may be indicators of experimental or regular substance use. The exhibit started in response to demand from local parents. Parents wish they had more information about identifying substance use and what to do if their kid is using drugs, alcohol and marijuana. ASAP volunteers wanted to do something about it and are excited to host this free traveling exhibit in the community and provide other resources for families and community members on teen substance abuse. ASAP is a coalition of community members devoted to cultivating a drug-free culture for youth in the Winona area.
    Suite 104
    Dr. Daniel Keyler, Adjunct Professor "When A Venomous Snake Bites: Consequences And What To Do (Or Not Do)"
    Venomous snakebite should be considered a true medical emergency, and seeking medical care following a bite should be of the highest priority. The risk of sustaining a venomous snakebite is greatest among those who work with, or collect and maintain, venomous snakes such as professional zoo staff and amateur herpetologists, respectively. Other more natural risks stem from the geographic locality in which one lives, and the species of snakes present, and their density in those localities where humans live. Outside of natural circumstances and encounters venomous snakebites typically result due to poor judgment, carelessness, fatigue, cavalier attitude, working with venomous snakes alone and without proper equipment, and lack of common sense. These factors hold true whether in the amateur home collection, or academic and professional settings. The possibility of death following a venomous snakebite is an ever-present concern in developing tropical countries, but is extremely rare in the United States. However, there are other more common consequences of venomous snakebite that must be considered and are often overlooked, such as the loss of a finger, loss of limb motion and function, and other long-term neurological disabilities. Taking appropriate actions in a timely manner in emergent situations are of significant importance to achieve a favorable medical outcome. Just, what will you do, and what will happen, if a venomous bite has occurred? These are basic, but essential, considerations. Many complexities can arise during the transport of an envenomed patient, and when the snakebite victim arrives at a medical facility. Given the unusualness of a venomous snakebite patient, and the possibility that a non-native species may be involved, medical personnel are frequently uncertain and unfamiliar with the most appropriate course of action to take. Will anti-venom be needed, and if so what type of anti-venom will be needed, where will the anti-venom come from, and is a clinical toxicologist knowledgeable in the treatment of venomous snakebite available for consultation if needed? Collectively, all these components need to be taken into account when a venomous snake has bitten a human being.
    Suite 105
    04:15 General Session
    Thomas Ward, B.A., EMS Supervisor (retired) "Threat or Challenge? Understanding Our Response To Crisis"
    The presenter faced the most challenging experience of his career when he commanded the EMS response to the I-35W bridge collapse in Minneapolis in 2007. To better understand the demands he and the other responders faced, and had to overcome, he studied the impact of stress on decision making and researched ways to successfully manage personal reactions during extreme situations. Perceiving a situation as a threat or as a challenge is central to understanding how we respond during a critical event and afterwards. The presentation uses dynamic images, personal stories and a unique insight into the bridge collapse to highlight the challenges responders face in big and small crises, and it outlines ways to recognize when performance is compromised. The presenter uses his background in Critical Incident Stress Management and Psychological First Aid to explore methods to strengthen resiliency before, during and after intense career changing events like the bridge collapse.
    Exhibit Hall
    5:00 Closing Remarks, Adjournment
    Exhibit Hall

Conference Location

  • Mayo Civic Center
  • 30 Civic Center Dr SE,
    Rochester MN 55904
  • Hosted by
  • Southeastern Minnesota EMS
  • Telephone Number
  • (800) 850-3397

Faculty